The NY Times' Case for a Climate Bill

Sun, 2010-01-24 12:35Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

The NY Times' Case for a Climate Bill

The New York Times’ lead editorial today is The Case for a Climate Bill and it’s well worth the read.

While chances of a clean energy bill in 2010 were damaged by the major upset last week in the Massachusetts special election, all does not seem lost. That is, according to the New York Times’ editorial board at least. They conclude that the only way we’ll see a climate bill in 2010 is if President Obama gets out and sells its virtues to everyday Americans.

It’s time for a road trip Mr. President.

Comments

What we’re starting to see with Obama is that he’s not a natural leader, he’s talker. The charm or whatever he has sounded good for a while but now it’s gotten tired and he is being tuned out. He’s a front runner and as long as everyone is onside and it all feels like a party, he’s fine, but when it comes to moving others to action in a substantive way and getting real work done, he becomes useless.

What is going on is that the Republicans have polarised the US and the political landscape. Obama is falling victim to the neocon PR machine which includes such outlets such as FoxNews.
Does this whole thing weaken or strengthen the US? Time will tell. But climate is probably going to suffer.

What is going on is that the Republicans have polarised the US and the political landscape. Obama is falling victim to the neocon PR machine which includes such outlets such as FoxNews.
Does this whole thing weaken or strengthen the US? Time will tell. But climate is probably going to suffer.

A Neocon PR machine? Surely you jest, the vast majority of the mainstream media caters directly to the wishes of Obama. One chanell out of hundreds is hardly a PR machine.

Obama is suffering from over exposure, over promising and under delivering, the halmark of a rookie in Washington. When he starts to live up to his campaign promises instead of doing the opposite he may gain some traction with the electorate, until then he is a used car salesman.

I agree. Obama has a far bigger congressional majority than Bush ever had, yet he has failed to capitalize on that. The lack of a filibuster proof majority in the Senate never stopped Bush from his agenda.

A climate bill is clearly a budget issue, and could be pushed through with reconciliation. Yet he’s letting a few Senators call the shots (which are all blanks, so far).

Unless he stops fearing the voter anger and starts leading them instead, I am beginning to serious suspect Obama will face a challenge from the Left in ‘12.

The following video says it all:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMlPE1lV_5Y

At what point does delusional thinking become so pronounced it is time to call in the head shrinks. Never mind, keep it up Kevin; I’m looking forward to this idea falling (predictably) flat on it’s face.

I think we should give Obama time to prove him self. After all he took over the problem

What will get included - something on jobs, for sure, probably immigration - isn’t yet clear. But I imagine that, given how little was done last year on climate (which is one reason the U.S. arrived with nothing in hand at Copenhagen), we are unlikely to see any major push on this except in the obviously related arena of green, reducing-carbon jobs. I just don’t think the administration believes there is anything to be gained by pushing what will be difficult legislation when people are mostly thinking about the economy. As you know, it’s easy - completely inaccurate, but easy - to make a public, sound-bite case that climate change legislation will harm the economy.

——- http://www.hhhwcenter.com/