economy

Fri, 2009-04-03 13:10Leslie Berliant
Leslie Berliant's picture

Why Are Mitch McConnell and John Boehner Working Against the Interests of America?

Reasonable people can disagree about the particulars of an energy and climate bill.

Some might say that the bulk of renewable investments should go toward wind and others might say solar. Some can insist that money raised from making polluters pay should go toward investments in more renewables and others can insist that such money should go to offset any costs to tax payers.

What is unreasonable is to posit that we should do nothing at all about our reliance on energy from fossil fuels or catastrophic climate change. What is unreasonable is to lie about the effects of proposed solutions. What is unreasonable is to complain about the ideas offered, but offer no alternatives. What is unreasonable is to act as if doing nothing is good for the American people.

So either certain Republicans are unreasonable, playing politics with energy and security, or they don’t care about what’s good for the American people.

Let’s start with the economy.

If you are against clean energy, you are against economic recovery and American jobs. We simply can’t solve the current economic crisis without addressing energy, climate and security. Oil imports cost us as much as $700 billion a year. Add to that $49.1 billion a year spent protecting our interests in the Persian Gulf (not including the costs of the Iraq war or what we spend in South America) and the 830,000 high paying jobs our oil dependence sends abroad.

Thu, 2007-03-08 10:50Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Canadian bank report plugs pollution taxes in climate-change fight

Saying people will pollute as long as it’s cheap to do so, economists at Toronto-Dominion Bank advocate taxing industry and consumers who contribute to global warming . A report also calls for combining emissions regulations, taxes, subsidies and an emission-trading system to lessen impact on the economy.

Fri, 2007-03-02 09:07Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

California touts new warming law as boon to economy

As coal-state officials struggle over growing demand for lower carbon emissions, California lawmakers told a Senate hearing in Washington, D.C. their legislation to cut carbon-dioxide output to 1990 levels by 2020 is predicted to bring $60 billion and 80,000 new jobs to the state economy.

Pages

Subscribe to economy