ForestEthics Advocacy

Sun, 2013-01-13 14:21Guest
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Respect Costs Nothing

by Nikki Skuce, Senior Energy Campaigner, ForestEthics Advocacy

Every time I read the comments section related to a story on First Nations activism, I am saddened by the depth and popularity of racism in Canada. This has been evident from the First Nations activism against Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline and tanker project, and from the current Idle No More national movement demanding the government respect this country’s original peoples.

From some of my fellow Canadians, you would think that First Nations are free-loading, tax exempt Indians who can be bought as long as the money’s right, and should just pick up and move if the housing ain’t right. If they’re too Indian, they should join us in the 21st Century; if they ride pick-ups and snowmobiles, they shouldn’t be allowed to voice any opposition to fossil fuel projects.

This mostly comes from those with avatars who leave nasty comments at the bottom of articles (an ignorance built upon gross inadequacies in our education system). When 130 First Nations came out in solidarity against the Enbridge pipeline a year ago, 10 out of 20 of the high scoring comments on the Globe and Mail article were all withheld having “violated our Terms and Conditions”. Others that remained included: “[Natives] are high class wh*res, like in this case”; and “a bunch of money in front of them and eventually opposition will disappear! not that difficult!”.

Tue, 2012-12-18 15:32Carol Linnitt
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Shell Abandons Fracking Plans For BC's Sacred Headwaters

Shell Canada announced that the company will immediately abandon plans to frack for natural gas in an area of British Columbia known as the Sacred Headwaters on Tahltan Nation traditional territory. The province of BC says it will issue a permanent moratorium on oil and gas tenures in the area.

A four-year moratorium, scheduled to expire today, began after Shell drilled three test wells in the area, igniting protest and blockades throughout the region and at Royal Dutch Shell headquarters in The Hague. In 2004, Shell was awarded a 400,000 hectare tenure in the Sacred Headwaters, the point of origin of the Skeena, the Nass and the Stikine rivers which are among the province's most important salmon-bearing waterways.

According to the Skeena Watershed Conservation Coalition, Shell's plans involved the construction of nearly 300 kilometers of road and over 4000 wells, as well as pipeline infrastructure and compressor stations. 
 
In a separate agreement, BC will award Shell $20-million in royalty credits, as compensation for the lost tenure. The funds will be redirected toward a water recycling project at Shell's gas drilling operations elsewhere in the province.
 
“Shell has backed away from a project only a handful of times. The powerful, relentless movement led by the courageous Tahltan and supported by nearly 100,000 people from around the world has not only stopped Shell, but persuaded the BC government to permanently protect the region from any further gas development,” said Karen Tam WuForestEthics Advocacy senior conservation campaigner. 
 
“It’s an inspiring day when communities in northern B.C. can stand up to one of the largest oil companies in the world and win. Congratulations to the Tahltan, and to the citizens and government of British Columbia.”
Tue, 2012-12-11 17:02Carol Linnitt
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Northern Gateway Pipeline Hearing Exposes Gaps in Enbridge Evidence

It looks like islands aren't the only thing Enbridge overlooks these days.

A report released today by ForestEthics Advocacy summarizes all of the information missing from Enbridge evidence brought before the Joint Review Panel in the Northern Gateway Pipeline hearing. The ongoing hearings, which began in September, address the proposed project's economics, construction plans, operations, environmental impacts, risks to marine life and First Nations' rights.
 
However ForestEthics suggests the evidence submitted by Enbridge is far from comprehensive. In fact, the company has “a frightening number of gaps in its information that won't be prepared until after approval is granted” to the project, says the report.
 
Below is an abridged version of ForestEthics' Pipelines and Promises, which outlines the evidence Enbridge has so far failed to submit to the Northern Gateway hearings:
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