government of canada

Thu, 2011-06-30 14:22Emma Pullman
Emma Pullman's picture

Canada Causes Cancer: Government & Industry Collude to Keep Asbestos Off UN Hazardous Chemical List

Last week, the Canadian government successfully and unilaterally stonewalled efforts to list chrysotile asbestos as a hazardous chemical at a United Nations conference in Switzerland. 

According to Michael Stanley-Jones of the UN Environment Program, “[Canada] intervened in the chemicals contact group meeting … and opposed listing”. This is the third time that Canada has derailed efforts to list the deadly mineral under the Rotterdam Convention.

Following Canada’s lead, the only countries that opposed listing asbestos under the convention were Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Vietnam. Even India, one of Canada’s largest asbestos customers and the leader behind efforts at COP 4 against listing, changed its stance.

Wed, 2011-05-04 13:56Emma Pullman
Emma Pullman's picture

Facing Four More Years of Harper Inaction, Canadians Must Rally Their Own Climate Leadership

Earlier this week, Canadians flocked to the polls for the fourth time in 7 years. This time around, the election was triggered when the minority government led by Conservative Party leader Stephen Harper was found in contempt of parliament in March for failing to release information related to the costs of proposed crime legislation and the purchase of stealth fighter jets.

From the moment the election was announced, Harper derided it as ‘unnecessary’, and ‘unwanted’ even though public polling clearly indicated widespread displeasure with his handling of the economy, public programming including programs for women, the environment, and for proroguing parliament twice. After the 2008 election, when voter turnout was the lowest in Canadian history (59% overall, and a dismal youth turnout of 37%), people wondered if this so-called ‘unwanted’ election would fail to motivate voters to the polls.

While pundits and pollsters made their best guesses leading up to election day, no one correctly anticipated the outcome. With just under 40% of the vote, the Conservatives finally won the majority they have coveted since ascending in 2006. The New Democratic Party (NDP) won 102 seats and formed the official opposition for the first time in history. The Liberal Party was reduced to a mere 34 seats, and the Bloc Quebecois lost 90% of its seats to end up with 4. On the positive side, Green Party candidate Elizabeth May won her party’s first seat in North American history.

Of the 14 closest ridings that Conservatives won seats, the combined margin of victory in all those ridings was 6,201 votes. That means the real difference between a Harper minority and majority was just over 6,000 votes. While 5.8 million people voted for Stephen Harper, another 9 million – the ‘real majority’ – voted for change. But, with his new majority, Harper no longer has to worry about impediments to his extreme ideology; he can ram his anti-science, pro-polluter agenda down the throats of the Canadian public. That spells trouble for Canada’s environment, and it’s especially bad news for the global climate.

Tue, 2010-12-14 12:18Emma Pullman
Emma Pullman's picture

Legislation Introduced To Ban Oil Tanker Traffic On B.C.’s North Coast

Today, Vancouver Quadra Liberal MP and former B.C. Environment Minister Joyce Murray introduced legislation in Canada’s House of Commons that would formally ban oil tanker traffic in B.C.’s North Coast.  Bill C-606 comes days after a successful House of Commons motion demonstrated support for a legislated ban on oil tankers.

Though the motion carried, the victory was only bittersweet because the motion passed is not binding, and merely calls on the Tory government to legislate a formal ban.  The Conservative government maintains that a ban is unnecessary since a long-standing, informal moratorium on oil tanker traffic and all offshore oil and gas activity has been in effect since 1972.  Yet last year, the Harper government quietly affirmed that it is not legally bound to maintain a moratorium on oil drilling off the coast of British Columbia.  The government determined that the 1972 ban doesn’t technically apply to oil-tanker traffic.  To date, eight Canadian prime ministers have upheld the moratorium, but that could all change.  The B.C. government is currently lobbying the federal Conservative government to revoke the ban.  Opposition parties fear the Tory government will allow the ban to be lifted in order to profit from growing Asian energy markets.

Fri, 2008-07-04 13:46Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

Climate Spin for Canada's Conservative Government

Yesterday the World Wildlife Fund and German insurance giant Allianz SE, ranked Canada the second to last in the G8 group of nations for its lack of effort to curb greenhouse gases emissions. Today the Canadian government is defending itself. In reaction to the WWF report, Gerry Keller, a spokesperson for the Minister of the Environment stated that:

The WWF said Canada's greenhouse gas emissions trends are going up and that emissions have increased. Yet for the last two years on record, Canada's greenhouse gas emissions have in fact gone down.” [my emphasis]

That would be very reassuring news, but unfortunately Mr. Keller's comment is little more than an attempt to shift the conversation away from the long-term projections that show Canada's greenhouse gas emissions to continue to rise in the years ahead.
Wed, 2007-12-19 15:01Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

Support For Harper Government "Plunges" - Global Warming Seen as Key Factor

A Harris-Decima poll released today shows that the governing Tory party in Canada, under the leadership of Prime Minister Harper is losing popularity quickly due in large part to their performance at the recent United Nation's global warming conference held in Bali, Indonesia.

The Harper government now finds itself in a statistical tie at 30% with the opposition Liberal Party.

Support for the Tories has dropped across all regions and demographic groups.
Tue, 2007-12-18 22:30Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

FaceBook Group: Environment is My Voting Issue in Canada

If you're on Facebook, please take a moment to add your name to our latest project called: “The Environment is My Voting Issue in Canada.”

For over a year and half, polls have identified the environment as the # 1 concern for Canadians.  

Using social media tools like Facebook we can send a message to the Government of Canada that their performance on environmental issues will be judged at the ballot box.

Tue, 2007-12-11 14:05Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

Canadian Environment Minister Baird Has a Case of the Bali Bumbles

It seems that Canada's Environment Minister John Baird is trying his best to live up to his critics' expectations at the United Nation's climate summit underway in Bali, Indonesia.

But it hasn't only been the Minister's unpalatable climate policies that are embarrassing his country on the world stage.

The Minister's bumbling and fumbling as a diplomat is also garnering a lot of chuckles.

It's like a blooper roll in real time.

Thu, 2007-10-04 09:28Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

Who's Lobbying Who About What in Canada?

Ever wonder who the big lobbyists in Ottawa are?

Surprisingly, the Government of Canada keeps an up-to-date and well-indexed database of current and past lobbyists to the federal government.

You can check it out here, it is searchable by name, company and subject.

Tue, 2007-05-01 17:19Kevin Grandia
Kevin Grandia's picture

NRSP's Tom Harris power chugs the kool aid on late-night talkshow

In a recent call-in portion on an Ottawa late-night call-in show, Tom Harris, executive director of the energy industry front group, the Natural Resources Stewardship Project (NRSP), offers up some laughable quotes:

Harris: “There was 100 people that appeared in the [government of Canada's] Clean Air Act hearings that just wrapped up and I went through the list and there wasn't a single doubter out of 100 people, that was questioning the science of climate change.”

Subscribe to government of canada