international climate change conference

Wed, 2011-12-07 16:27Guest
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U.S. 2020 climate treaty proposal isn’t a delay—it’s a death sentence

Ed note: Originally published by our friends at Grist.org.

by Jamie Henn of 350.org
 
The U.N. climate talks desperately need a crisis. For the last 10 days, negotiations here in Durban, South Africa, have made little progress on the fundamental challenge these talks were set up to confront: how the world can come together to avoid catastrophic climate change.
 
Instead, the pace of negotiations has been set by the one country the rest of the world should be turning their back on: the United States.
 
The U.S. never signed the Kyoto Protocol, the only legally binding international agreement designed to reduce emissions, but it is allowed to take part in the negotiations in a separate track dedicated to securing a long-term climate agreement. After President Obama's election, the international community had high hopes the new administration would bring a new sense of ambition and commitment to talks.
 
Instead, the only thing the U.S. brought to the table was a wrecking ball. Rather than standing out of the way and letting the rest of the world get on with setting up an international architecture to facilitate cutting emissions, stopping deforestation, and investing in renewable energy, the U.S. has spent the years since Copenhagen attempting to systemically dismantle the U.N. process.
 
Highest on the U.S. hit list is the Kyoto Protocol, an imperfect treaty (thanks in large part to U.S. recalcitrance), but currently the best instrument in the global climate toolbox. Next on the list is the very idea of legally binding commitments – the U.S. would prefer a “pledge and review” world where countries make their own voluntary commitments and then report out on what they've decided.
 
Here in Durban, however, the U.S. has taken on an even more insidious role by pushing a proposal that the international community adopt a “mandate” to negotiate a new climate treaty that will take effect in – wait for it – 2020.

Roy Innis

roy-innis

Roy Innis

 Credentials

Roy Innis claims that his experience of climate science comes from being “exposed to climate variation dynamics while a student in chemical engineering at the City College of New York.” [1]

Read more: Roy Innis

Richard Rahn

richard-rahn

Richard W. Rahn

 Credentials

  • Ph.D., Business Economics, Columbia University (1972).
  • Honorary Doctor of Laws, Pepperdine University (1993).
  • M.B.A., Florida State University (1964).
  • B.A., economics, University of South Florida (1963).

Source: [1]

Read more: Richard Rahn
Tue, 2008-02-19 15:31Kevin Grandia
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Heartland Institute Lures Legislators with Free Hotels for Climate Skeptics Conference

If there is a sweeter deal for Republican Senator “global warming is hoax” Inhofe I don't know what it would be.

DeSmogBlog has received the details of an invitation that has apparently gone out to elected officials promising them “lodging and pay for up to two (2) nights of accommodation,” in New York if they would like to attend the Heartland Institute's “International Climate Change Conference.”

The invitation goes on to add that elected officials who are a member of the Heartland's “Legislative Forum,” will also receive an extra bonus of $300 to cover travel expenses.

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