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Sun, 2014-01-12 06:00Jim Hoggan
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Recommended Reading: The Agony of Frank Luntz in The Atlantic

This is a worthwhile read about a morally confused guy who would, if he continues to do what he does so well, make the problem he is distressed about worse. He seems unable to see his own hand in all of this polarization and promotion of goofy ideas.

I suspect that most of us looking at what Luntz has done would say finding cracks in public thinking and figuring out how to use them to get people elected is going to take us down a dark road.

With his advice to Republicans in 2002, Luntz turned climate science into one of the most partisan issues in American politics.

“The scientific debate is closing [against us] but not yet closed. There is still a window of opportunity to challenge the science. Voters believe that there is no consensus about global warming within the scientific community. Should the public come to believe that the scientific issues are settled, their views about global warming will change accordingly. Therefore, you need to continue to make the lack of scientific certainty a primary issue in the debate.”

The public was mistaken about this and Luntz either knew or should have known they were mistaken.

He knows there is something wrong but doesn't know it is him.

Head over to The Atlantic to read The Agony of Frank Luntz.

Wed, 2011-03-16 13:13Ashley Braun
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Bill to Block EPA Climate Regulations Moves Forward in Congress

On Tuesday, Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives moved one step closer to passing a bill to permanently prevent the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from regulating global warming pollution. The House Energy and Commerce Committee approved the bill, H.R. 910 or the “Energy Tax Prevention Act,” in a vote that fell mostly along party lines.

Under the guise of lowering gas prices, the bill would deliver several very lethal blows to EPA efforts to address climate change – and to President Obama’s energy agenda – by:

Tue, 2011-03-01 11:47Ashley Braun
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Are U.S. House Republicans confusing "Americans" with the "American Petroleum Institute" by cutting pollution protections?

Kids love clean air and support EPA

Recent polls confirm that Americans across the country and political spectrum actually do agree on at least one thing: that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should keep doing its job – and even do more – to set limits on air pollution, including greenhouse gas emissions. Unfortunately, two influential groups feel differently than nearly seven in ten Americans on this issue: Republicans in the House of Representatives and the American Petroleum Institute, a powerful lobbying group representing the oil and gas industry.

The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and the National Lung Association, who represent environmentalists and American lungs, respectively, each released public polls asking whether EPA scientists or Congress should make decisions about pollution limits. A key finding of the National Lung Association poll was that “voters overwhelmingly oppose Congressional action that impedes EPA from updating clean air standards [PPT].

At the same time, Congressional Republicans are claiming a mandate to cut funding for government programs like the EPA. House Republicans almost unanimously voted to prevent the EPA from doing its job – and specifically from enacting regulations on carbon emissions this year - by cutting EPA’s 2011 budget by $3 billion in the spending bill which passed the U.S. House on February 19, 2011. 

”This is about listening to our country, listening to the people who just elected this Congress to restore discipline with respect to our spending,” Frank Guinta (R-New Hampshire) said during the debate on the budget legislation. But to whom Republicans are listening should perhaps be up for debate.

Mon, 2008-09-15 10:11Jeremy Jacquot
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Newt Gingrich’s “Solutions” for America’s Energy Woes: Drill, Baby, Drill!

If anybody deserves credit for almost single-handedly revitalizing the once defunct movement for offshore oil drilling, it’s former Republican Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich.

After spending a few years wandering the political desert, salvaging his tarnished reputation and peddling his views on various conservative outlets, Gingrich made a political comeback of sorts when he founded American Solutions for Winning the Future, a supposedly non-partisan (or, in his words, “tri-partisan”) 527 group, in late 2007.

Mon, 2008-08-25 12:42Kevin Grandia
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Capitol Hill candidates urging inaction on global warming

“The science behind “global warming” doesn't really explain why the past models haven't been accurate, or why there are holes big enough to drive a Mack Truck through in the current models. There is currently no support for the contention that it's caused by humans,” says Republican congressional candidate David Crowley.  

And Crowley is joined by many other wanna-be politicians with their heads firmly planted in the sand when it comes to the realities of human-caused global warming. 

The National Resource Defense Council (NRDC) has a project up and running for the Fall's House of Representatives races asking candidates 5 questions on the environment including one on global warming.

Tue, 2008-08-05 18:26Kevin Grandia
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Paris Hilton's Energy Policy [video]

So who knew Paris Hilton was an energy pundit. Outside of her platform on offshore oil, I think she hits the nail on the head. But the whole painting the White House pink thing… not so much. Enjoy!
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