Alec Loorz

Wed, 2012-04-04 14:11Ben Jervey
Ben Jervey's picture

Young Americans Sue Government to Stop Global Warming, Polluter Interests Granted Intervention To Defend

Last May, a group of young Americans, fed up with government inaction on climate change, decided to sue to protect their future. The group, led by 16-year old Alec Loorz, founder of Kids vs. Global Warming and the iMatter campaign, filed legal actions against the federal government and 49 states, seeking to force the states and federal government to develop a comprehensive plan to reduce greenhouse gas pollution to levels deemed necessary by the best available science.

Earlier today, a D.C. District Court judge ruled that the National Association of Manufacturers and other polluter interests can intervene on the government's behalf to argue that they have the right to keep on dumping carbon pollution into the atmosphere.

So the case is sure to prove controversial and the world will be watching to see how the courts handle the matter in the weeks and months to come.

As Loorz, now 17, explained to me last week, the decision to sue the government came only after seeing the failures of the Executive and Legislative branches in addressing the problem.

Thu, 2011-05-05 11:27Joanna Zelman
Joanna Zelman's picture

iMatter Marches Worldwide This Week: Time For The Younger Generation To Lead

Government officials with degrees and offices in the nation’s capital can’t seem to get it together to fight global warming. So a bunch of kids who aren’t old enough to vote have decided to take the charge instead.

The iMatter movement was founded three years ago by Alec Loorz, who at the time was just 13 years old, but already recognized the urgent need to fight climate change and focus on global sustainability.

Between May 7th and May 14th, iMatter will hold international youth marches to raise awareness of the importance of fighting global warming. According to iMatter, these marches are “the largest ever mobilization of young people against climate change.” Organizers expect tens of thousands of people to march in the U.S. alone.

Beyond the marches, the youth leaders are planning to appeal to the courts in a series of legal and administrative actions that will soon be filed against all 50 states and the federal government.

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