Thu, 2014-07-17 14:36Sharon Kelly
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Oklahoma Earthquake Swarm Spurs Fracking Wastewater Disposal Debate

Last weekend, a swarm of seven earthquakes in just 14 hours between Saturday evening and Sunday morning in Oklahoma made national headlines.

Those seven quakes were immediately preceded by another earthquake that measured 4.3 on the Richter scale in Langston, OK, which struck at noon on Saturday. And on Monday, a quake that measuring 3.9 hit just northeast of Harrah, OK, followed in the same region just hours later by a 3.8 magnitude earthquake, data from the U.S. Geological Survey shows.

The ground in Oklahoma keeps shaking, and state, federal and independent researchers have pointed to the shale gas rush as the likely culprit for many of the tremors. Some in the state have called for a halt to fracking and wastewater injection. Others are pushing to allow the injections to continue in the hopes that more research will allow scientists to pinpoint what makes individual disposal wells pose greater or lesser risks.

The problem highlights the intractability of one of the biggest problems created by fracking and drilling: what to do with the over 660 billion gallons of oil and gas industry wastewater created every year, largely by the rush to drill for shale oil and gas. The most common answer is to pump the waste deep underground, but a growing body of research shows that the process is causing earthquakes nationwide.

Over the past seven days, Oklahoma has experienced more than 20 earthquakes, roughly half of them over 3.0 magnitude, USGS data reveals. These quakes are usually small, with little immediate damage reported, but homeowners say they fear for their foundations and some larger earthquakes over the past several years have led to hospitalizations from falls. The 4.3 magnitude quake on Sunday shattered windows and cracked the walls of a local police station.

Oklahoma has had more earthquakes than any other state in the U.S. this year, shaken by more than double the number of tremblers that have hit California, a state twice its size that sits atop the notoriously active San Andreas fault line.

Wed, 2014-07-16 16:38Kevin Grandia
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The Earth Hasn't Stopped Warming, Hate to Say It

I wish it were true, but the earth is not cooling and there remains an upward curve in the temperature of our planet. 

So next time you're at a dinner party and someone says the earth is cooling and throws some air quotes up when he says “global warming,” here's a simple way to explain it away. 

Here are the average global temperature measurements up to this point as measured by NASA. You can see the red average line that has been marching up a pretty steep hill for many decades now:

Wed, 2014-07-16 01:26Julie Dermansky
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Breaking: Denton City Council Rejects Fracking Ban: Referendum Will Be on November Ballot

The failure of the Denton city council to pass a fracking ban in Denton, Texas, after a meeting that went on for over eight hours last night, was no surprise to Cathy McMullen, Denton resident and president of Denton Drilling Awareness Group.

“The vote was theater,” McMullen told DeSmogBlog.

Councilman Kevin Roden was the only one to call for ban. His motion was not seconded. A motion to deny the ban was approved 5 to 2, followed by an unanimous vote to put the ban initiative on the next ballot.

After a landmark ruling in New York State Supreme Court that upheld a city-imposed ban on fracking in Dryden, N.Y, the battle to ban fracking in Denton is being closely watched.


Reagan Stinson, in front of her home in a subdivision at Bonnie Brae Street and Vintage Boulevard, across from an EagleRidge Energy site. Stinson told DeSmogBlog the constant activity at the site made it hard for her to sleep. ©2014 Julie Dermansky  

Denton, a college town, sits on top of the natural gas-rich Barnett Shale. Within the city limits, there are fracking sites less then 300 feet from people's homes.

Dozens of residents who spoke at the meeting told city council how fracking has destroyed the quality of life for those who live near the frack sites. The meeting was attended by over 500 people who heard first-hand testimony of health issues, noise, traffic problems and reports of diminishing property values.

McMullen's group gathered close to 2,000 signatures for an initiative to ban new fracking within Denton's city limits. With all signatures verified, the initiative was presented to the city council resulting in last night’s mandatory council vote.

Tue, 2014-07-15 18:08Kevin Grandia
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CNBC Again? Marshall Institute Chairman Brings Hitler Into Climate Conversation

In a live interview on CNBC, William Happer, chairman of the Marshall Institute, stated that the “demonization of carbon dioxide is just like the demonization of the poor Jews under Hitler.”

This is not the first time Happer has said this, and watching the interview it seems as though the CNBC host was keen to see Happer make the ugly analogy again. 

As Media Matters points out, CNBC introduces Happer as an “industry expert” on climate change, but fails to mention that Happer has never published any scientific research in the field.

I am just speculating, but maybe CNBC meant “industry expert” in the sense that Happer's Marshall Institute is an “expert” at getting millions from the fossil fuel “industry” and right-wing foundations over the years to support their ongoing attack on the science of climate change.

Tue, 2014-07-15 15:53Kevin Grandia
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New Map Shows Dramatic Time Lapse of Tar Sands Deforestation

Alberta oilsands development tar sands

A time-lapsed map released today by the World Resources Institute using satellite imagery from Global Forest Watch shows how much forest is being lost in Northern Alberta to make way for major industrial operations, mainly to extract oil from the tar sands, also referred to as the oilsands.

According to the data compiled by Global Forest Watch, industrial development and forest fires in Canada's tar sands region have cleared or degraded almost 2 million acres (775,000 hectares) of boreal forest since 2000.

The pink regions depict forest loss. Watch what happens at year 2010:

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