Offsets Fall Short -- By Two-Thirds

Only about a third of the climate-damaging carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere in North America is offset by carbon-removing activities, a government report said.

According to the new U.S. study, North America released 1,856 million metric tons of carbon into the air in 2003 – 85 percent from the United States, 9 percent from Canada and 6 percent from Mexico.At the same time, growing vegetation and other sources took in about 500 million metric tons of carbon.

Celebrate Our Coal, Come On!

This is probably not the celebration Kool and the Gang had in mind when they wrote their hit song “Celebration.”

But its America's overabundance and over-reliance on the dirtiest form of electrical generation that has one industry front group celebrating.

Check out this website run by an organization called the “Americans for Balanced Energy Choices (ABEC), and in particular their “50% TV Spot” video.

All Global Warming is Local - The Politics and Science of Regional Climate Impacts

A key question is, how can we best champion nature and the environment when both are changing due to global warming, and when we lack—or, worse, when our government denies us—adequate information about the nature of those changes and how to cope with them?

How do we prepare ourselves for a changing climate, community by community, region by region? How should San Diegans get ready for global warming, and how does that differ from how Floridians or Kansans should respond?

Let’s quit sidestepping the facts; global warming is tied to too many people

Relentless human-population growth coupled with rising consumption has outpaced the planet’s ability to cope. An article in BBC’s Green Room says we are now in “overshoot” – our numbers and levels of consumption greater than Earth's capacity to sustain us for the long-term. The writer says we must end world population growth, and then reduce population size in industrialized as well as developing nations.

ExMo Chief: energy independence is "isolationist"

On the same day Hilary Clinton released her plan to reduce the US addiction to foreign oil imports and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the CEO of the largest oil company in the world is balking at the pursuit for energy independence.

Rex Tillerson, chairman and chief executive of Exxon Mobil, has hit out at “isolationism” in energy policy (full article is firewalled) arguing that attempts to pursue energy independence are futile and counter-productive.

Tillerson stated that:

Regardless, no conceivable combination of demand moderation or domestic supply development can realistically close the gap and eliminate Americans' need for imports.”

His remarks, made at the World Energy Congress in Rome, provided support for calls from Opec, the oil producers' cartel, for what the group calls “security of demand”.

 

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