canada

Mon, 2007-09-24 10:48Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Canada’s Harper evokes ‘F-word,’ touts technology at UN summit

The prime minister’s call for flexibility at the largest-ever political summit on climate change held firm with the Conservative government's opposition to a UN-driven push for short-term binding targets, and its preference for goals that have less economic impact. Not to worry, though, technology will save the day.

Sat, 2007-09-22 11:43Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Federal report scorns Canada's climate-change plan for exaggerating carbon cuts

A government-appointed advisory panel says in a 38-page report the Harper administration has gone too far in estimating the potential results of its global warming strategy. The group also said the government's plan is vague and uses questionable accounting methods. The report comes as the Conservative government is being sued by green groups for its foor-dragging.

Fri, 2007-09-21 10:56Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Scientists ‘stunned’ as Arctic sea ice shrinks to 30-year low

Arctic ice has melted to its lowest recorded level, with scientists and researchers blaming rising concentrations of greenhouse gases, which have pushed up temperatures from one to four degrees.

Thu, 2007-09-20 09:33Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Green groups sue Canadian government over Kyoto targets

Foot-dragging over meeting the Kyoto protocol’s emissions targets could land the Conservatives in federal court. Two environmentalist groups have filed papers seeking quick action from the government under new legislation.

Thu, 2007-07-12 00:08Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Global-warming deniers shift gears in their distraction conspiracy

A column in a Seattle newspaper says growing consensus on human causes of climate change has forced deniers to switch tactics, abandoning shrill demands for scientific evidence – which is ample – for “drive-by shootings” such as exaggerated estimates of energy consumption in Al Gore’s house in Tennessee, or Prince Charles flying across the Atlantic to receive an environmental award.

Thu, 2007-06-28 11:43Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Canada must tax emissions quickly or suffer consequences, report says

Unless Canada puts a price tag on carbon emissions it risks “serious economic dislocation” in the form of sharply reduced economic growth. Given sufficient advance notice as to the financial incentives for cutting emissions, however, companies and consumers can make appropriate decisions.

The interim report can be found here. (pdf) 

Wed, 2007-06-27 10:29Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

World Heritage sites threatened by climate change; UN urged to seek carbon cuts

A United Nations conference has been urged to protect six World Heritage sites, including Mount Everest and Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, from global warming. Campaigners hope to persuade the group to reverse last year's decision to reject cuts in greenhouse-gas emissions.

Mon, 2007-06-25 13:31Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Rich nations blamed for global warming, but not for all the right reasons

As forecast, China has overtaken the U.S. in carbon-dioxide emissions due largely to China’s heavy reliance on coal. Another factor is its well-publicized population of 1.3 billion. But per-capita emissions are much higher in developed countries, where populations are exploding due to immigration. The U.S. already releases four times the carbon per-capita each year as China. And the U.S. population, which has been doubling every 40 years, is headed for one billion by the end of this century!

Tue, 2007-05-29 09:50Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Mum Harper seen backing Bush effort to undermine international climate-change pact

The Prime Minister is under fire from both Liberals and New Democrats for remaining non-committal on whether Canada will back a proposal by Germany for a post-Kyoto agreement when G8 nations meet in Germany next week. China, India, Brazil, Mexico and South Africa will also be part of the discussions.

Sun, 2007-05-27 12:54Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

Remote Alaskan villages struggle with consequences of climate change

In Alaska and northern Canada, the once-permanently frozen subsoil known as permafrost, which many native settlements rest upon, is now melting due to warming air and ocean temperatures. And sea ice that would normally protect coastal villages is forming later in the year, allowing fall storms to erode the shoreline.

Pages

Subscribe to canada