canada

Sun, 2007-05-27 12:54Bill Miller
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Remote Alaskan villages struggle with consequences of climate change

In Alaska and northern Canada, the once-permanently frozen subsoil known as permafrost, which many native settlements rest upon, is now melting due to warming air and ocean temperatures. And sea ice that would normally protect coastal villages is forming later in the year, allowing fall storms to erode the shoreline.

Tue, 2007-05-01 10:10Kevin Grandia
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Poll finds worldwide global warming concern

A new BBC World/Synovate international poll out today shows that Canadians are the most concerned about global warming, along with two-thirds of the rest of the world.

Here are the key findings:

33% of Canadians are “very concerned” about the effects of climate change, while another 43% are “somewhat concerned”.

Only 0.4% believe the climate isn't changing.

Sun, 2007-04-15 17:29Emily Murgatroyd
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Do Nothing, Risk Everything

A recent report published in March by the Ethical Funds Company found that out of 48 Canadian oil and gas companies studied, only 2 were responding in any meaningful way to address the risks associated with global warming; Shell Canada and Suncor.

Using a wide variety of sustainability metrics, EFC scored each company to determine how well they are prepared to meet the increasing demand for environmentally and sustainably sound practices in the oil and gas sector as it becomes more and more clear that climate change is a reality and will have a significant effect on operations and investor relations.

 

Fri, 2007-03-23 12:35Bill Miller
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Gore says Quebec is Canada’s climate-change conscience

The former U.S. vice-president said the rest of Canada is “pretty good” but he singled out Quebec as the “conscience of Canada” on global-warming.

Gore and green-guru scientist David Suzuki chided the mass media for ignoring scientists’ warnings about climate change and giving too much space and credibility to skeptics and deniers.

Fri, 2007-03-23 11:01Bill Miller
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Toronto girds for climate-change battle

Canada’s largest city is embarking on a plan to fight climate change and global warming by slashing greenhouse-gas emissions by 80 per cent from 1990 levels by 2050. Mayor David Miller says cleaning the air is “the issue of our time, maybe of all time.”

Fri, 2007-03-23 09:49Bill Miller
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77 per cent of Canadians convinced global warming is real

Although the vast majority is convinced, a new survey by Angus Reid Strategies also found that people in various regions hold different attitudes. In Alberta, as example, 69 per cent of respondents said they believed in global warming, while in Quebec, the number soared to 83 per cent.

Fifty-seven per cent of Quebecers, moreover, said they are promoting better behavior toward the environment while only 36 per cent of Albertans said they are doing the same.

Fri, 2007-03-16 11:14Bill Miller
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Canadian government pulls plug on climate-change policy group

A wire dispatch suggests the move illustrates the Harper government’s intention to seize control of a politically charged issue by wresting it away from bureaucrats. The Climate Change Policy Directorate, a working group that has played a key role in shaping policy, has been eliminated by Environment Canada.

Tue, 2007-03-13 12:05Bill Miller
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Harness prairie wetlands in climate-change battle

A study has found that the prairie wetlands of North America hold vast potential for absorbing the greenhouse-gas emissions linked to global warming.

Thu, 2007-03-08 10:50Bill Miller
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Canadian bank report plugs pollution taxes in climate-change fight

Saying people will pollute as long as it’s cheap to do so, economists at Toronto-Dominion Bank advocate taxing industry and consumers who contribute to global warming . A report also calls for combining emissions regulations, taxes, subsidies and an emission-trading system to lessen impact on the economy.

Thu, 2007-03-08 09:29Bill Miller
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U.S. stifles officials from responding to global warming questions

Internal memorandums circulated in Alaska’s federal Fish and Wildlife Service appear to muzzle government biologists traveling abroad in Arctic countries from discussing climate change, polar bears or sea ice without official authorization. Only those who “understand the administration’s position” can talk to the issues.

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