Malcolm Hughes

Fri, 2010-11-26 19:13Emma Pullman
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2010 In Review: Scientists and Journalists Take Stock and Share Lessons Learned

There’s no doubt about it. It’s been a challenging year for climate science and climate scientists, for journalists, and for the public. A string of legislative and regulatory disappointments coupled with dizzying political spin have left many more confused than ever about the overwhelming scientific consensus of climate change. 

It’s been a particularly grim year following the Citizens United decision that ushered in a new era of rampant electoral spending on climate change denial; the U.S. midterm elections produced a Senate filled with climate change skeptics and deniers; a failed climate bill or two, and after the Copenhagen talks failed to produce any real results.  In addition, many pundits and analysts are giving us good reason to believe the U.S. won’t see a climate bill for two years, and little reason to believe that real climate progress will be made in Cancun next week. It seems there’s a lot of reason to feel distressed.  

Last week marked a year since the so-called Climategate “scandal” sent climate change deniers into an echo chamber frenzy.  Bud Ward and John Wihbey aptly note that to even call it “climategate” lends it credence that is undeserved.  Yet it is imperative that we try to learn lessons from it.   This certainly won’t be the last difficult year for the climate change movement; an increasingly challenging political environment promises more interesting times ahead, both for the science and for the scientists who devote their lives to the subject.  In a nutshell, we’ve got our work cut out for us.

Mon, 2006-07-24 12:07Ross Gelbspan
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Energy-Funded Pol Launches Yet Another Congressional Mannhunt

Rep. Ed Whitfield, a Republican congressman from Kentucky (and a darling of the coal, gas, oil, auto and railroad industries), will be holding yet another set of hearings on the famous “hockey stick” climate reconstruction graph by Drs. Michael Mann, Raymond Bradley and Malcolm Hughes.  Mann indicated he will testify – even though his graph has become a lightning rod for climate-change deniers.

(They deniers seem oblivious to the fact that Mann's work has been thoroughly peer-reviewed and approved by a number of studies, most recently by the US  National Research Council.  They also seem not to understand that even if Mann's work were proved to be fatally flawed, it is only the latest of many scientifically approved studies that prove we humans, by our burning of coal and oil, are trashing the planet.)

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