Nicholas Stern

Thu, 2014-02-20 19:27Graham Readfearn
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Climate Change Denier Roy Spencer Says People Who Use Word 'Denier' Are 'Global Warming Nazis'

Prince Charles is a “global warming Nazi” and, apparently, so is U.S. President Barack Obama.

That’s according to Dr. Roy Spencer, one of the world’s most often cited deniers of the risks of human-caused climate change.

In a blog post titled “Time to push back against the global warming Nazis,” Dr Spencer of the University of Alabama, Huntsville, wrote that he had made a decision about anyone who used the term “denier” to describe … well… deniers of the threats of human-caused climate change. 

He’s going to call them “Global warming Nazis.”

Spencer wrote:

When politicians and scientists started calling people like me “deniers”, they crossed the line. They are still doing it.

They indirectly equate (1) the skeptics’ view that global warming is not necessarily all manmade nor a serious problem, with (2) the denial that the Nazi’s extermination of millions of Jews ever happened.

Too many of us for too long have ignored the repulsive, extremist nature of the comparison. It’s time to push back.

I’m now going to start calling these people “global warming Nazis”.

Sat, 2012-09-15 06:00Ben Jervey
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No Breakthroughs Necessary: 95 Percent Renewable Energy Possible By 2050

Shutterstock | James Steidl

It’s a commonly held belief, even within the climate action advocacy community, that significant technological breakthroughs are necessary to harness enough clean, renewable energy to power our global energy demands.

Not so, says a new study published this month, which makes an ambitious case for “sustainable sources” providing 95 percent of global energy demand by mid-century.

This new analysis, “Transition to a fully sustainable global energy system,” published in Energy Strategy Reviews, examines demand scenarios for the major energy use sectors – industry, buildings, and transport – and matches them up to feasible renewable supply sources.

Over on VICE’s Motherboard, Brian Merchant dug into the study and put it into proper context.

It is entirely possible, using technologies largely available today, to power nearly the entire world with clean energy—but we need to conjure the will to make revolutionary strides in public policy and the scale of deployment.

Tue, 2009-01-13 23:17Jim Hoggan
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Canada to study economic impact of climate change

It’s hard to know whether to celebrate or to weep.

CanWest News Services reporter Mike de Souza has learned that the government of Prime Minister Stephen Harper is calling for a lightning fast (eight-week), bargain basement ($40,000) report on the potential economic impacts of climate change in Canada.

We certainly laud the Prime Minister’s sudden interest, but if this is anything more than a public relations exercise designed to lobby the anti-science cohort in his own caucus, it is an affront - so terribly inadequate to the task as to only further humiliate Canada on the international stage.

Mon, 2008-01-14 12:56Bill Miller
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It’s already later than we realize in the struggle to arrest climate change

A recent essay says the most pressing current scientific and political challenge is to avoid what is known as “dangerous” global warming – the point where world temperatures become irreversible.

As there’s a 25-to-30-year lag between greenhouse emissions and the full impact of their warming, current climate chaos is a result of carbon spewed in the late 1970s. The hit from more recent discharges – including China’s coal plants – is but pain yet to come.

So we’re dangerously close already.

Tue, 2007-03-27 10:52Bill Miller
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Climate change and poverty go hand in hand, expert says

British economists have urged India to battle climate change, saying vulnerability to the phenomenon goes hand in hand with poverty . Dimitri Zenghelis, lead author of the Stern Review, which examined the costs and benefits of climate change moderation, said there is 90 per cent recognition of climate change in the developed world compared with only 50 per cent by developing countries.

Wed, 2007-02-21 09:11Bill Miller
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Science group issues its first warning against climate-change threat

The board of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the nation’s leading general science organization, has issued a statement declaring global warming “a growing threat to society.” The first-ever stand by the AAAS, which publishes the journal Science, also attributes recent warming to human activity.

Mon, 2007-01-15 10:11Bill Miller
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Brazil adopts plan to boost deforestation in the Amazon

The Brazilian government has announced the first-ever introduction of large-scale logging in its tropical rain forest despite the potential impact on global warming. Logging in the remote Amazonian heartland will be “monitored” by a new and untested government agency and local officials.
Tue, 2006-10-03 08:55Ross Gelbspan
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World Bank to W: There Is No Free Climate Lunch

Energy and environment ministers from the world's top 20 polluting nations are meeting in Mexico to consider the economic costs of climate change. Former World Bank chief economist Sir Nicholas Stern is expected to say rich nations must cut emissions immediately, and help developing nations adapt.

 

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