This just in: Europe and U.S. reach climate accord

Thu, 2007-06-07 12:01Bill Miller
Bill Miller's picture

This just in: Europe and U.S. reach climate accord

After threatening an outright veto of any reference to concrete reductions, the U.S. broke a trans-Atlantic deadlock by agreeing to “seriously consider” such proposals in a deal widely viewed as a compromise by President Bush.

The agreement did not specifically include the 50 per cent reduction sought by German Chancellor Angela Merkel, but it did endorse her request that climate talks take place under the United Nations. It also carried Bush’s proposal to bring the world’s largest polluters – including China and India – together to set emission-reduction goals.

Although the deal enabled the group to reach accord, it does not fundamentally alter the White House’s refusal to accept binding targets for reducing emissions.

Comments

But it doesn’t come close to reaching an accord - 50% by 2050 is like saying “the end of time is when we will talk about it some more”. 2050???? Why even discuss that far into the future before finding ways to at least level off emssions, to not increase them anymore. GHGs emssions will, apparently,continue to increase until 2049 and then the fossil fool cheifs will say “that darn Bush pushed us too far, we cannot meet those targets”. It is widely agree that what we do before 2012 will have the most effect in avoiding the worst extremes of weather and climate change. We just lost 10 years in Exxon funded denials, we have to make up time now. They are raising new ideas now - bringing up 2050, and skewing the targets to measure what “half” means with “current levels” instead of 1990 levels. Obviously, our leaders refuse to listen to the public will. Impeach the lot of them over the threat they pose due to emissions reductions delays. Seriously, it is a real threat. You realise that in 5 years we could have oceans rising fast due to ice sheet slippage?
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Keystone XL protest

More than 100 scientists and economists “concerned about climate change and its impacts” signed an open letter Monday calling on U.S. President Barack Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry to reject the proposed Keystone XL pipeline project, which would transport oilsands crude from Alberta to refineries on the Gulf Coast, mainly for export.

The signers “urge [President Obama and Secretary Kerry] to...

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